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English Department @ McKinley Education Campus

English I, II, III, and IV, Pre-AP I and II, and AP Classes

English I, II, III, and IV:

The English department is committed to guiding students to become better thinkers and writers through inquiry-based lessons that offer exposure to classic and contemporary literature, non-fiction, analytical discussion, and quality writing instruction.  We offer a variety of Language Arts classes, including, required English classes - Regular, Pre-AP, and AP classes.

English I: (E 03) Introduction to Literature and Composition
Credit - 1 credit
Prerequisite: none

Students study literature and sharpen reading, writing, and language skills. This English course builds upon the literary knowledge and language skills covered in English 8. Students will learn the elements of analytical reading and literary analysis. Students will be able to write structured paragraphs, short compositions, letters, narratives, and at least one research project using appropriate technology. Also, students develop and practice writing and language skills. PSAT Grammar review and vocabulary development are included in every unit. They employ the writing process to create a narrative, expository, and persuasive compositions.

English II: (E 04) Critical Reading and Effective Writing
Credit - 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I or Pre-AP English I

This English course builds upon the literary knowledge and language skills covered in English I. Students will learn literary genre, critical reading, and literary analysis. Based on readings and research, students will be able to write arguments, informative/explanatory works, and narratives. Summaries and annotations support fluency and comprehension of all reading material. The writing program builds confidence in young writers by targeting control of the organization, active sentences, and word choice.

English III: (E 05) American Literature
Credit - 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I, II or English I Pre-AP, English II Pre-AP

This English course builds upon the literary knowledge and language skills covered in English II. Students will learn classical and contemporary literature with an emphasis on American works. Students will be able to write arguments, informative/explanatory works, and narratives in response to readings and research. Emphasis is placed on writing expository and research.  Students learn and practice workplace communication skills in special activities, and they practice gathering, evaluating, synthesizing, presenting, and documenting information in a unit dedicated to writing research reports. Also, students develop and practice writing and language skills. SAT and ACT Grammar review and vocabulary development are included in every unit.

Senior Reasearch Project (Part One: Juniors): The Senior Research Project is a challenging, student-driven, teacher-guided culminating Project. Senior Project requires juniors and their instructors to agree on a project that incorporates a 15+ annotated bibliography and a detailed outline.

English IV: (E 06) British and World Literature
Credit - 1 credit
Prerequisite: English III, the Pre-AP English III, or AP Language and Composition

This English course builds upon the literary knowledge and language skills covered in English III. Students will study multicultural and world classical and contemporary works with an emphasis on British literature and World Literature. Also, students develop and practice writing, such as well-developed arguments, informative/explanatory works, book and media reviews, and a documented paper, using appropriate technology and language skills. SAT and ACT Grammar review and vocabulary development are included in every unit. 

Senior Research Project (Part Two: Seniors): The Senior Research Project is a challenging, student-driven, teacher-guided culminating Project. Senior Project requires seniors and their instructors to agree on a project that incorporates a research paper, a product, and a presentation.

Pre and Advanced Placement Courses:  Pre-AP I and II, AP Language, and AP Literature

Advanced Placement (AP) courses are college-level courses that follow the College Board Advanced Placement guidelines. These courses involve a significant accumulation of knowledge in the field that is tested on the AP exam. Colleges and universities have the option of accepting the AP results for college credit.

Courses designated as "AP" are college-level courses and students should expect course subject matter and workload at a college level. Students enrolled in AP courses are required to take the AP exam at the end of the year.

Pre-AP English I: (E 09)
Credit - 1 credit
Prerequisite: none

This Pre-AP English course serves as preparation for Advanced Placement courses and focuses on a close reading of poetry, novels, plays, stories, and essays, both classical and modern. Students will learn rhetorical devices and concepts needed for writing close literary analysis. Students will be able to write a literary review, as well as argumentative, expository, and creative writing with increasing sophistication. The The Pre-AP course curriculum is an enriched, accelerated program based on introducing and developing College Board strategies. Pre-AP courses teach the skills necessary for success in AP courses, and students should expect extensive reading and writing assignments. Enrolling in a Pre-AP course is highly recommended for students who wish to take Advanced Placement courses in the future.

Pre-AP English II: (E 36)
Credit - 1 credit
Prerequisite: English I or Pre-AP English I

This Pre-AP English course builds upon the content covered in English I or Pre-AP English I and serves as an Advanced Placement feeder course. Students will learn rhetorical devices, symbolism, alternative writing styles, and the development of the modern novel. Students will be able to produce close literary analyses, as well as argumentative, expository, and creative writing with increasing clarity and sophistication. Students in this course can expect a significantly higher number of reading and writing assignments. The Pre-AP course curriculum is an enriched, accelerated program based on introducing and developing College Board strategies. Pre-AP courses teach the skills necessary for success in AP courses, and students should expect extensive reading and writing assignments. Enrolling in a Pre-AP course is highly recommended for students who wish to take Advanced Placement courses in the future.

AP English Language and Composition: (E 08) (Junior Only)
Credit - 1 credit
Prerequisite: English II or English II Pre-AP

The AP English Language and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic, rhetorical analysis, and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP Exam and further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.

Senior Research Project (Part One: Juniors): The Senior Research Project is a challenging, student-driven, teacher-guided culminating Project. Senior Project requires juniors and their instructors to agree on a project that incorporates a 15+ annotated bibliography and a detailed outline.

AP English Literature and Composition: (E 07) (Seniors Only)
Credit - 1 credit
Prerequisite: English III or AP Language and Composition

The AP English Literature and Composition course aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature, such as novels, plays, poems, and short stories from various periods to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. The equivalent of an introductory college-level survey class, this course prepares students for the AP Exam and further study in communications, creative writing, journalism, literature, and composition.

Senior Research Project: (Part Two: Seniors):  The Senior Research Project is a challenging, student-driven, teacher-guided culminating Project. Senior Project requires seniors and their instructors to agree on a project that incorporates a research paper, a product, and a presentation.

Elective Courses:

Creative Writing: (E 11)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English writing course is designed for students who are competent in writing skills and mechanics but are interested in enhancing their writing creativity. Students will exercise their observation skills and sharpen their sensitivity to language as they write poetry, short stories, essays, biographies, and autobiographies. Students will be able to express themselves in an artistic manner using sound writing techniques and standard American English.

Public Speaking: (E 35) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course provides students with a broad range of experiences in oral communication. Students will learn group discussion techniques and parliamentary procedures. Students will be able to give increasingly demanding speeches and express their abstract ideas in concrete form.

Debate I: (E 38) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course introduces skills necessary for students to become in-depth researchers, technical and persuasive writers, effective communicators, and perceptive listeners. Students will learn about argumentation and persuasion theories and public speaking techniques. Students will research topics, organize findings, and write persuasive cases.

Debate II: (E 39) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course builds on the skills developed in Debate I. Students will learn argumentation and persuasion theories, logic, and analysis. Students will research topics, organize their research, write persuasive cases, and deliver their arguments orally.

Journalism I: (E 42)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This journalism course exposes students to techniques of writing for a newspaper or magazine. Students will study theories and procedures of journalism and examine all aspects of newspaper publication (gathering, writing, editing, displaying the news, and using technology) and other mass media.

Journalism II: (E 43)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This journalism course builds upon the skills learned in Journalism I, with a focus on advanced skills such as using the latest technology to produce a high school newspaper. Students will assign and produce all publishing tasks: writing stories, editing copy, designing ads, writing headlines, and making layout designs. This course is recommended for students interested in related careers.

Journalism III: (E 44) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

This journalism course builds upon the skills learned in Journalism II. Students will apply all aspects of the writing process (i.e., pre-writing, drafting, editing, and proofreading) to written work. Students will be introduced to the skills necessary to produce a variety of mass communication documents. Students will demonstrate knowledge of organization and management techniques relating to mass communications, including leadership and business skills, time management, and use of personnel and task organization. This course is recommended for students interested in related careers.

Yearbook: (E 45)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course focuses on skills needed to produce the school yearbook. Students will cover techniques of advertising, journalistic writing, photo selection, and layout design. Students learn about possible careers in printing, costs of printing, and printing techniques.

Multicultural Literature I: (E 54)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course surveys the historical development of ethnic American literature from its origins to modern times. Students will read, discuss, and write on African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, and Native American literature, seeking commonalities and an understanding of the different contributions of each ethnic group. Students will analyze a variety of genres, including the novel, drama, poetry, short story, nonfiction, and others. Completion of several short papers and one longer documented paper of 500-800 words is also required.

Multicultural Literature II: (E 55)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course, which builds upon Multicultural Literature I, focuses on 20th-century literature from around the world. Students will read, discuss, write about, and give presentations on a variety of literature from Africa, Latin America, India, China, Asia, and other areas. Emphasis will be on student discussions and contributions. Students will also write evaluations of texts and take quizzes and exams.

African American Literature: (E 58) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course introduces the history of the literary and cultural heritage of African Americans, beginning with the African oral tradition and progressing to modern African American literature. Students will read and analyze the oral tradition, spirituals, essays, short stories, poetry, narratives, and drama. Completion of a well-constructed 500-800 word analytical or documented paper is also required.

African American Experience Literature: (E 60)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course explores the literary and cultural heritage and experience of African Americans through the interdisciplinary study of American literature, art, and music from 1789 to the present. Students will learn about the various eras and genres of related literature and construct a significant analytical or documented research paper of 500--800 words.

Women in African American Literature: (E 61)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This course explores the experiences of African American women through a variety of texts. In the first section of the course, students explore how African American women combated harsh labels in defining their race and gender. The course then pivots to discuss the meaning of feminism to African American women. In the course's third section, students explore African American female sexuality. The course concludes with a discussion of African American women writers as activists. Students will read Pauli Murray's "A Blue Print for First Class Citizenship" in which she exposes the disadvantages of African American womanhood amid social change. They will then explore the modern civil rights movement from the African American female perspective by engaging with pieces like "A Herstory of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement" and Yale women of color's "Voices from the Movement."

Social and Political Movements in African American Literature: (E 62) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

This course seeks to expose students to the profound impact of African American literary works on social and political movement throughout American history. It is framed by four themes: identity; freedom; mobility; and security and opportunity. In the first of these four sections, students explore how writers grappled with the burden of "double consciousness" and reflect on how African Americans are forced to live according to boorish and restrictive archetypes. The second section focuses on freedom, beginning with a focus on freedom from slavery and servitude, then shifting to more nuanced notions of freedom-namely, freedom from an unjust prison system, which is currently incarcerating millions of African Americans. The third section addresses social and political mobility. The last section of the course discusses how African Americans are barred from the same notions of security and opportunity that many Americans hold so dear. Students explore American housing law and the fight for equal educational opportunities for African American students.

Technical Writing: (E 64) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

This English course provides instruction and practice in the processes and conventions of effective technical writing communication. This course will expect students to use a process approach to writing, including strategies for the following: audience analysis, pre-writing, drafting, peer sharing, revising, editing, and formatting. Other essential processes discussed in this course include gathering, using, and documenting data from primary and secondary sources; adapting technical information to both technical and non-technical audiences, and recording and reporting technical information clearly and accurately. Students will produce technical reports of varying lengths and complexities that follow accepted conventions of language, style, mechanics, and format. Oral presentations on different topics based on individual occupational interests will be required.

Writing Research Skills: (E 65)
Credit - 0.5 credit

This writing course covers basic writing and research techniques necessary for mass media communication. Students will analyze the enhancement of literary analysis, and critical thinking will be discussed in the context of this genre through a variety of oral and written projects.

Dramatics: (E 70) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

This Drama course involves simulated mass communications writing experiences such as writing for newspapers, magazines, radio, television, public relations, and advertising. Students will engage with experts from the communications community will conduct seminars and design projects that will engage students in writing activities.

Argument Writing: (E W5)
Credit - 0.5 credit

In this course, students will read and analyze literary and informational complex texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately. Focus on valid selection, organization, and analysis of content leads to writing well-developed arguments to support claims using logical reasoning and effective rhetoric.

Advanced Argument Writing: (E W6) 
Credit - 0.5 credit

Students read, analyze, and synthesize multiple authoritative sources that examine or convey complex ideas or information. Sources include textual, visual, graphics, primary and/or secondary sources on the subject under investigation. Argument writing uses relevant and enough evidence, sophisticated reasoning, and a wide range of rhetorical devices to support claims.

 

 

 

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